Category Archives: Charter Schools

Just How Inaccurate NPR’s Piece On Rocketship Public Schools Is

On Friday, NPR’s Education section released an article tackling Rocketship Public Schools’ teaching practices. They also claimed that not only were the school’s education standards below par, but a “high rate” of re-tests showed that teachers were helping their students through the exams.

The assumption boiled down to the claim that students were receiving an easy ride during their time with Rocketship Public Schools. The NPR Education article also seemed to suggest that these “significant” re-tests showed how weak the education standards are in Rocketship Public Schools around the country. However, the article in questions got the facts wrong about some key areas in their report.

The first among these is that some sources who work Rocketship Public Schools claim that their words were either misconstrued or taken out of context to fit the tone of the overall piece. Of the nine that were interview by NPR, six have claimed that their comments were mischaracterized. There are some other critical facts that the article gets wrong. Firstly is the question of re-testing at Rocketship Public Schools, which the report claims is widespread across the schools. See Rocketship Public Schools reviews https://www.yelp.com/biz/rocketship-public-schools-san-jose

This couldn’t be further from the truth;, in the latest assessments in California, only six students retook a single test out of 4,565 tests that were administered. In the Spring assessments, only 15 students retook an exam out of 12,706 tests. Between that and the California statistics, it’s less than a fraction of a percentage. However, that leaves open the assertion that these exams were somehow rigged; if that were the case, then students would be out of their depths in Middle-School.

On the contrary, it’s been shown that many Rocketship Public Schools alumni have far exceeded many of their peers when they move on to new schools. Rocketship Public Schools are the market leader in non-profit public charter schools in the country. The teachers and other staff ensure that a student’s true potential is realized through the use of technology and working with students to develop themselves personally. Not only do the schools aim for academic quality, but growth as a person overall.

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Success Academy: Expanding at Rapid Rates

Success Academy has no intention of backing down. As more students apply for a seat in one of their schools, Success Academy is asking New York City to allow them to expand. With only 3,017 seats to offer in 2017. The Success Academy has become a beacon of shining light in the education industry in New York. Test scores, learning methods, teaching methods, and engagement is all of imperative value in these schools.

 

According to Eva Moskowitz, CEO and Founder of Success Academy, this is an issue charter schools deal with every year. Parents seek alternatives for their children through charter schools, but Moskowitz argues that accommodating them is impossible until the city allows them to expand their facilities.

 

For the fourth year in a row, Success Academy has a waiting list with more than 10,000 prospective students. This, Success Academy claims, is due in no small part to NYC’s failing public schools. Families are filled with hope at the opportunity of attending a Success Academy public school.

 

According to their own numbers 30% of applicants to Success Academy come from zones with the worst performing schools in the city. This includes 5,600 Bronx families, which, when put into clearer terms, translates to 15 prospective students for every seat available. This includes more than 600 applicants that would otherwise be placed in Renewal schools, a struggling reform initiative the city has put forth.

At present there are 41 Success Academy schools operating everywhere in the city except for Staten Island. This has allowed them to offer charter school space to 14,000 NYC children.